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Hitsumabushi

Grilled Eel on Rice

Though eel may be instantly associated with Hamana-ko Lake, Shizuoka Prefecture, its top production area is actually Aichi Prefecture. Eel is slit open along the belly and grilled whole without steaming - that's the Nagoya style of cooking eel. Hitsumabushi is a local eel dish, which is said to have originated at the end of Meiji Era as waitresses dished up each serving of chopped grilled eel on rice from a large wooden tub for keeping cooked rice (o-hitsu) into individual bowls of customers in a tatami-mat room. The eating procedure is also unique. To begin with, the whole eel dish is divided into four portions. You put the first portion into your bowl and enjoy as it is; then you put the second helping in and put on some condiments (wasabi horseradish, nori dried laver, mitsuba trefoil, etc.) to your taste. The basic spice combination is chopped green onions, grated wasabi, and nori seaweed sheet cut into pieces, which go well with grilled eel. Enjoy the changes in tastes. Then you have the third portion in the same manner as the second portion plus green tea or broth poured over it, like o-chazuke soup with rice. And, finally, you can enjoy the remaining portion repeating one of the three methods you liked best!

Please contact each restaurant for more details.

Restaurants

This restaurant was originally founded in 1873 at Atsuta Jingu Shrine. Hitsumabushi eel got its start as ...
Enjoy Nagoya's famous hitsumabushi eel at Ibasho in the Nishiki San-chome neighborhood.
Since its establishment in 1953, this restaurant has served its famous, savory-smelling, hitsumabushi eel...
One minute on foot from the south exit of Kanayama Station. Eel raised using deep-ocean water is savorily...
This restaurant is remarkable for its eel-themed architecture. Its famous hitsumabushi eel is grilled by ...
At this restaurant, great care is put into ingredients as well as the method of grilling and the interior...
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